Great fashion writing doesn’t reduce everything to what is for sale, what’s hot and not. Great fashion writing looks at clothing and the uses of clothing with the same amount of cultural reverence we give a Lars von Trier movie or the U.S. Open, as something that exists, and it asks why it exists, and how it fits into its larger culture.

haley killin’ it over at the awl on vogue and more

Lately I think I’ve been (admittedly incorrectly, but HILARIOUSLY) using “rococo” and “baroque” as sneering insults of sorts for, you know, things unnecessarily decorative, complicated, excessive, probably something despicable like pastel, and for everything from frustratingly complicated clothing to overstyled-but-undercooked-food to terrible heavy-handed poem-y writing.
Then, sometimes, I have to eat my words, because Tim Walker decides to go and do a photoshoot for Italian Vogue that’s like Marie Antoinette threw up on Miss Havisham in a powdery abandoned ballroom and “dishevelled pastel rococo anachronism of awesome” is pretty much the only way to describe it, and I totally can’t get enough of it.



More at Haute Macabre.
Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.Ok, endless potential for racial/social dissection and analysis aside (white chick with cat-eye makeup to mimic Asian-ness, never a good thing… but somehow simultaneously I guess it’s, like, ‘progressive’ to depict a white female + Asian male   together rather than the usual inverse? ANYHOW.) Point: I was psyched to stumble upon this 2001 Vogue editorial by Stephen Meisel, featuring Amber Valetta and based on Wong Kar Wai’s In the Mood For Love. The film-like framing and unexpected focus, the colours and focus on detail, the 60’s decor, the film grain, the minimal retouching (look! arm hair!! pores! harsh shadows! her arm smooshing against her body! wrinkles! so awesome!)…. unf.